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Would you like a coastal garden, or do you live quite close to the sea and wonder what plants would do well in your garden? It's Alexandra here from the Middlesized Garden, YouTube channel and blog, and I'm here with garden designer Posy Gentles, who's just designed a coastal garden, a few hundred yards away from the beach here at Whitstable.

. One of the best ways of seeing how plants will grow well in your garden is to see them in their natural habitat. But of course not, many of us are going to hike up the mountains in Jordan to see black irises or go to China to see rhododendrons growing in the wild.

But we can sometimes walk along a beach and just looking at the plants that spring out. In a beach will teach you a lot about the plants that will look good in your coastal garden.. So if you haven & # 39, t got a beach near.

You then join us here on Whitstable beach. Coastal garden plants, aren't just for people who live on the coast. If your garden is dry or windy or has poor soil, then actually you could find these coastal garden plants work really well for you.

. So what do you look for in coastal garden plants? Well, obviously, drought, resistance and something that's, not too rigid, so that the plant can move. If it's windy., You can plant things that are not that hardy because near the coast you don't tend to get heavy frosts, so that's.

Why you see things like echiums from Madeira and and palms near the coast.? This is quite a glamorous seaside garden with a black bungalow. It's, a typical seaside bungalow, but painted this rather lovely charcoal black, which provides an excellent backdrop for very bright dahlias kniphofia.

The Calamagrostis'Karl Foerster & # 39. Not all these plants are what you'd, find in a list of good coastal plants, but they work together.. The dahlias, probably you wouldn't, always use, but kniphofia is an excellent coastal.

Plant. Grasses are good because if you get wind, they just swish around they don't blow. Over. Pittosporum is pretty good good, as well. Primarily Posy says you should look for plants that withstand drought.

Well, and of course, many of us have had some quite dry summers, yet these get followed sometimes by very wet autumns or wet springs. So what you need above all, is really resilient plants, and this is a list of the really resilient plants, some of which Posy has used in these two gardens.

So best evergreen coastal plants. Escallonia is used quite a lot in municipal plantings and i think people have started to forget about it, but it will pretty much put up with anything and it has very pretty pink.

Flowers. Myrtle can be a small tree or a large bush, and this is really quite an old myrtle in Whitstable high street, and it just has a beautiful bark and lovely pretty white flowers. Lavender is a very easy plant to grow unless you have very wet heavy Soil.

Rosemary, upright and prostrate -is excellent coastal garden plant and a really useful herbs for the kitchen with a nice architectural structure. Perennials are at the heart of many gardens. You plant them, you look after them.

You enjoy them in the summer. During the winter they often go underground, and then they pop back up again the following summer. So they're, very much less work than annuals. The best coastal garden. Perennials are mullein or verbascum.

You could try Verbascum chaixii & # 39. Album & # 39, as Posy has in this garden. Here. Salvias many salvias do really well in dry conditions and they're very resilient plants. But just a word of warning: some salvias do prefer wet climates, so you just have to check which salvia you're planting and also some of them are not reliably perennial.

. I bought Salvia'love and wishes'and thought it would come back year after year, but it didn't survive even one winter. Fennel. Here in Whitstable there's, something called hog fennel, which is of a Special scientific interest, and so the fennel type things you're.

Seeing in these pictures, probably aren't wild fennel. They're hog fennel, but anyway, what about trying bronze fennel in a coastal garden? Sea kale is called crambe or crambe, maritima, probably not pronounced properly, which grows on beaches and you can also buy for coastal gardens, or you can also get Crambe Cordifolia, which is a much taller version.

Valerian valerian officinalis as it's called. This is a plant that is so easy to grow, that everybody thinks it's weed, but it really is pretty and it comes in white and pink. Globe, thistle or echinops.

These also are very, very easy to grow and wildlife. Just love, them. Mine grow very tall, and then i chop them down, and then i get another flowering. Not so tall later on in the year. Sea, holly or eryngium looks like a thistle.

It's, a very pretty blue grey architectural plant. It looks great in any garden and particularly good in a coastal garden and will put up with drought and wind. Kniphofias red hot pokers. They come in, yellow and orange as well, and they wouldn't be suitable for a garden absolutely on the beach.

But if you're a few streets back, then they will enjoy the slightly more sheltered mild coastal climate, and then there's. Verbena bonariensis, which i absolutely love, and I've, often wondered why it doesn't go into the middle of my borders, which is where i would like to have it.

It's, always kind of on the edge or self seeding itself in a gravel path, but verbena bonariensis really does seem to like quite poor soil and dry conditions, and then of course, there are the coastal garden.

Shrubs and grasses. Grasses are fantastic in a coastal garden because, of course the wind just blows over them and it won't. Flatten them and many grasses will do well, but some grasses do require more moisture where they grow.

With grasses. They're, either suitable for dry coastal gardens or they're suitable for damper areas. You just need to check that. Broom, so there's, several kinds of plants which are commonly called broom and you'll, see broom on the seaside.

. What's called broom actually covers quite a few different types of plants, and they have this kind of thin leaves and yellow flowers, and Genista is the botanical term for the ones we would be most likely to get in our gardens.

And roses.. Roses are surprisingly resilient and rosa rugosa or rosa glauca will do well in coastal situations. In fact, you see rosa rugosa growing on beaches.. I asked Posy for her other tips on planting a coastal garden such as & # 39.

Should we be using a gravel mulch & # 39, We decided to put down a mulch of cockle shells which is much lighter than gravel and also in the end will decompose. So I rather like using it.. I don't use a membrane with it, partly because I think you don't really have to.

If you get the thickness. Okay and also, it always ends up showing sort of scraggy edges, which I don't like.. So often when you're planting a border, you don't want to see any earth, but because the shell is very nice, it's very light and it's not going to have loads of weeds Growing up through it because it works as a weed suppressing mulch.

So you can use very architectural plants like eryngium and Libertia grandiflora, which really show up beautifully against the shell, and you can give each plant its space. In terms of coastal garden style.

Generally, the beach garden look is often based around vintage or salvaged objects and bright colors that fade in the sun.. I've got a video which I'll, put in the description below about buying vintage things at flea markets and also another video about windy garden plants and solutions which I'll put in the description below, along with Links to Posy, Gentles, Garden, Design and other resources.

I'm. Mentioning here. There's, a playlist on garden design at the end of this video, and if you'd like more tips, ideas and inspiration for your garden then do subscribe to the Middlesized Garden, blog or YouTube channel, and thank you for Watching would you like a coastal garden, or do you just live quite close to the sea and wonder what plants would do well in your garden? It's alexandra here from the middlesized garden, youtube channel and blog, and i'm here with garden designer posey gentles, who's just designed a coastal garden, a few hundred yards away from the beach here at whitstable.

One of the best ways of seeing how plants will grow well in your garden is to see them in their natural habitat. But of course not, many of us are going to hike up the mountains in jordan to see black irises or go to china to see rhododendrons growing in the wild.

But we can walk along a beach and just looking at the plants that spring out in a beach will teach you a lot about the plants that will look good in our coastal garden. So if you haven't got a beach near.

You then join us here on whitstable beach, coastal garden plants, aren't just for people who live on the coast. If your garden is dry or windy or has poor soil, then actually you could find these coastal garden plants work really well for you.

So what do you look for in coastal garden plants? Well, obviously, drought, resistance and something that's, not too rigid that can move. If it's windy, you can plant things that are not that hardy because near the coast you don't tend to get heavy frosts, so that's.

Why you see you know um things like ekiums from madeira and and palms near the coast. This is quite a glamorous seaside garden with a black bungalow typical seaside bungalow, but painted this rather lovely charcoal black, which provides an excellent backdrop for very bright dahlias nippoffia.

The kalamagrostus karl forster, the thing is not all these plants are what you'd, find in a list of good coastal plants, but they work together. The dailies, probably you wouldn't, but nippoffia you do find that's.

Excellent grass is good because if you get wind, they just swish around they don't blow over his sporum is pretty good good as well primarily posey says you should look for plants that withstand drought.

Well, and of course, many of us have had some quite dry summers, yet these get followed sometimes by very wet autumns or wet springs. So what you need above all, is really resilient plants, and this is a list of the really resilient plants, some of which posey has used in these gardens so best evergreen coastal plants, escalonia escalonia, is used quite a lot in municipal plantings and i think people have Started to forget about it, but it will pretty much put up with anything and it has very pretty pink flowers.

Myrtle myrtle can be a small tree or a large bush, and this is really quite an old myrtle in whitstable high street and it just has a beautiful bark and lovely pretty white flowers. Lavender lavender is a very easy plant to grow unless you have very wet heavy soil, rosemary, upright and prostate excellent coastal garden plants really useful herbs for the kitchen and a nice architectural structure perennials at the heart of many gardens you plant them, you look after them.

You enjoy them in the summer, during the winter they often go underground, and then they pop back up again the following summer, and they say they're, very much less work than annuals. If you're looking for a coastal garden, the best coastal garden perennials are mullein or verbascum, you could try verbascum chaixia, as posey has in this garden here.

Salvias many salvias do really well in dry conditions and they're very resilient plants, but just a word of warning, some salvias do prefer wet climates, so you just have to check which salvia you're planting and also some of them Are not reliably perennial.

I bought salvia love and wishes and thought it would come back year after year, but it didn't survive even one winter fennel. Here in whitstable there's, something called hog fennel, which is a special scientific interest, and so the fennel type things you're.

Seeing in these pictures, probably aren't wild fennel. They're hog fennel, but anyway, what about trying bronze fennel in a coastal garden, sea kale sea kale is called cranberry or crambo maritime, probably not pronounced properly in the sea which you can buy for coastal gardens, or you can also get cranberry cordifolia, Which is a much taller version, valerian valerian officinalis as it's called.

This is a plant that is so easy to grow, that everybody thinks it's weed, but it really is pretty, and it comes in white and pink globe. Thistle or ekinops these also are very, very easy to grow and wildlife.

Just love them. Mine grow very tall, and then i chop them down, and then i get another flowering not so tall later on in the year sea holly - or this looks like a thistle. It's. A very pretty blue architectural plant looks great in any garden and particularly good in a coastal garden and will put up with drought and wind knit field red hot pokers.

They come as yellow and orange as well, and they wouldn't be suitable for a garden absolutely on the beach. But if you're a few streets back, then they will enjoy a slightly more sheltered, quite mild climate, and then there's.

Verbena bonariensis, which i absolutely love, and i've, often wondered why it doesn't go into the middle of my borders, which is where i would like to have it. It's, always kind of on the edge or itself seeding itself in a gravel path, but being a bonariensis really does like quite poor soil and dry conditions, and then, of course, there are the coastal garden shrubs and grasses grasses are fantastic in a Coastal garden because of course the wind just blows over them and it won't flatten them and many grasses will do well.

But some grasses do require moisture conditions with grasses. They're, either suitable for dry coastal gardens or they're suitable for damper areas. You just need to check that groom. So there's, several kinds of plants which are commonly called broom and you'll, see broom on the seaside.

What's called broom actually covers quite a few different types of plants, and they have. This kind of thin leaves and yellow flowers and genista is the latin term for the ones we would be most likely to get in our gardens and roses.

Roses are surprisingly resilient and rosa rugozo, rosa glauca will do well in coastal situations. In fact, you see rosary, grosser growing on beaches. I asked posey for her other tips on planting a coastal garden such as.

Should we be using a gravel mulch, we decided to put down a mulch of cockle shell, which is much lighter than gravel and also in the end, will decompose. So i rather like using it. I don't use a membrane with it, but partly because i think you don't really have to.

If you get the thickness okay and it always ends up showing sort of scraggy edges, and i don't, like saw you know, often when you're planting a border, you just kind of don't want to see Any earth but because the shell is very nice, it's, um very light.

It's not going to have loads of weeds growing up through it because it works as a weed suppressing mulch. So you can use very architectural plants like aryngium and they all say, libertia grandiflora, which really show up beautifully against the shell, and you can kind of give each plant its space in terms of coastal garden style.

Generally, the beach garden look is often based around vintage or salvaged objects and bright colors that fade in the sun. I've got a video which i'll, put in the description below about buying vintage things at flea, markets, vintage and second-hand things at flea markets, and also another video about windy garden plants and solutions which i & # 39.

Ll. Put in the description below, along with links to posey, gentles, garden design and other resources i mentioned here there's, a playlist on garden design at the end of this video, and if you'd like more tips, ideas and inspiration for Your garden then do subscribe to the middlesized garden blog and thank you for watching.

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