Legal Information

I'm, a firm believer of growing potatoes in containers and one question that I always get asked is: how often, should I be watering my container potatoes Well in this video? I'm gonna answer that question for you.

And I'm gonna give you a load of tips to help you retain water and make your lives much easier.. I'm Tony O'Neill, and this is Simplify Gardening, where I show you how to garden in a simpler way.. If you want our perfect garden to relax in or just want to grow your own nutrient-dense foods.

Then start now by clicking the subscribe button and the bell icon., Then click all to be notified. Each time I release new content just like this., But before I get into the content, though, I would just like to say a massive thank you.

, Because a couple of days ago, my channel hit 100,000 subscribers and 8 million views.. I'm totally really appreciative of that and it's really humbling the fact that you guys continued to support me every single day.

. So thanks very much for that. I appreciate it.. So let's, get back into the content.. If you asked a hundred gardeners, which is the best way to grow potatoes, you'd, get a hundred and one different answers.

. For me, though, it has to be the container. Whether you're growing in pots bags or any other container. You get to choose the an actual environment that your potatoes are growing in, and you're, not governed by the quality of your soil, because you can control this environment completely.

. Now. One thing that I've noticed with a lot of new gardeners is that they struggle when growing in containers. Due to the sheer amount of watering that's required., They say that they're, constantly watering every single day and they're losing all the time because they can't keep the soil hydrated potatoes require About an inch and a half of water per week - and that includes rainfall.

And in containers, though I know the people are struggling because in a container the surface area can evaporate and the water can run out of the holes in the bottom. So it can really make keeping these moist like quite a difficult task.

. So I'm gonna give you a load of tips in which to not only conserve moisture in these containers, but also make your lives easier.. But before I do that, I'm going to answer the question outright.. How often do you need to water potatoes in containers? Well, you need to water about once a week when you first start your container and then, as the height of summer comes, then you want to be watering around about every three or four days.

Now I know for some of you that's, unbelievable Because you & # 39, ve been watering these every day and they've still been dry., But I'm gonna give you those tips right, now.. You may have tried growing potatoes and containers for many years and found yourself watering.

Every single day, huge amounts of water to keep them hydrated.. So here's, a few tips to help you with that and kept the work down for the gardener.. So my tip number one is to consider your soil. Soils hold varying amounts of moisture and compost is really good for this, because it holds lot of water due to the amount of organic matter in it.

. It soaks this up like a sponge.. Now it's, really important to keep your compost or soil whatever you're using moist, because if you don't keep it moist, it will dry out and it will shed water rather than absorbing it.

. And you think that you've, given it enough water when in fact it's actually just running off. Tip number two is to bury the container about a fifth of its height.. Now, as you can see, I've done that right here now.

What this does is it allows the water that is released will be holes in the container to be absorbed by whatever you bury the containers in, and this is fantastic, because that water can be absorbed instead of being lost, and then it can be released back into The container via the wicking process.

, Now, as you can see what I've done here, I haven't buried. My buckets., I've, actually laid down a membrane, and I've placed the bucket on the membrane, and then I've, buried around the buckets with woodchip of different particle sizes.

And that's quite important. As you can see, we have all different sizes of woodchip particles here and both this does any water that is shed from the buckets is held within that wood chip, and then it can be released back to the buckets later.

. That will also keep the containers cooler. So if you're suffering with heat like I know, a lot of you are in Australia and other places. What this does it, as this gets wet from the water that's escaped from the containers it is absorbed into this, and these then act like a heat sink.

And it absorbs the heat away from the potatoes. So it's. Another really good point in mulching around. If you're using soil, it doesn't work so well, but using a woodchip around and it absorbs that heat really well, so it's, a really good way in to remove some of the heat from the containers.

In really hot places. Now tip number three is to mulch, and a lot of you are now growing in these containers are very similar because of my potato growing videos that you've seen and I've, never noticed anybody else using Mulch but it's really important to mulch the surface.

. Now this does a couple of things: not only does it retain water in the actual compost or the soil that your using, but it also holds moisture because this mulch is absorbent and again that will hold moisture, keeping a moisture cap on top of the soil and Will release that into the soil, as is required.

Mulching? The surface cannot only help to keep down evaporation, but the mulch itself really absorbent. So it holds the moisture and it releases this back to the soil as it dries out.. Now I thought I'd.

Give you a practical view on this, because I watered these potatoes five days ago. And, as you can see, the mulch on the surface is really dry. But as you get down through the layers, it becomes moister and moister, and even the soil itself is still very moist, so it's.

A perfect example of how the mulch holds and retains water.. These were watered five days ago and the soil itself is still damp, and this is perfect for potato growth because it has the moisture and the heat that's required for really good potato growth.

. Now the mulch holds that moisture and releases it as its required and the Sun can't bake, the top of the soil surface.. Now this is good for a couple of reasons, but the main one is because it aids in future watering, because that soil, doesn't then just shed the water.

. These three tips will really cut down on the amount of water. You're using and will save you hours worth of time in watering throughout the season., And this is how I'm growing mine this year, because it will save me loads and loads of time, and it will also allow the potatoes To fend for themselves, should I not be able to come to the garden due to the current circumstances.

, So the next thing is: we need to look at the different forms of watering that we could use with these and their benefits and the reason why we should Use each of those. The first way is to water by hand using a watering can.

. Now I know that this is a way in that most people are going to water, their potatoes. And we simply water until the water runs out of the holes in the bottom.. But is this really a sufficient amount of water? I think not.

. And the reason for this is because, if you have allowed that soil to dry out, then that water will be shed by the compost and literally run down the sides of the containers and out of the holes, and you think you've.

Given enough water, but where, in reality it hasn't absorbed enough at all.. However, the running water out to the bottom of the container is a great way to tell if there is plenty of water., But you need to do in a couple of ways.

. If you find that you have dry soil, then you need to water. First, give it about ten minutes and then give a second watering until it runs out the bottom of the container. At that point, you know you've absorbed enough water into the soil, to get it totally saturated and the soil moist enough right throughout its whole entirety.

Give it a second watering, and if the soil is moist, you don't need To do that, you can just stick your finger in up to its knuckle and you'll know if it's, moist or not.. The next options we have would be to use some form of drip.

Irrigation such as these or even T- tape or soaker, hose a perforated hose that runs across the top, and when that is pressurized, it will slowly drip water onto the soil surface over a period of time.

. Now that's, really good. If you & # 39, ve got time to allow it to water, or you can set up a pre watering time schedule via an electronic timer or something Because you can just connect it to a tap leave it on and it will kick on and off.

As and when which will keep these moist., However, you decide to water. Remember this one tip you're, far better off watering deeply and making sure that all the soil is moist. Then watering every single day.

Get that soil really moist right from the start, and it also helps with the next watering from being absorbed. Knowing when to water, is also really important.. Simply pull back. The mulch stick your finger into that compost and if it comes out that you & # 39, ve got compost on your finger.

You know its moist enough if it feels dry or anything like that. It's time to water and water. It well like we've already discussed. Now, although I haven't done it. Yet. I'm implementing some other techniques across here that will help me grow my potatoes.

This year., I'm, going to raise some wire mesh screen with holes around about four inch square, like cattle grids, cattle wire and that's, going to be raised, maybe about a foot and a half above these containers.

. What that is going to do is allow the potato haulms to grow through that wire mesh. It will support all of these container haulms as one unit.. So when it's windy and it heavy rain, the tops of the potatoes will stand up straight.

This will allow me to get in here and water if I require it, but more importantly, it keeps the foliage up high. This will stop and act like a canopy, stop that Sun beating down on the surface but, more importantly, it stops the foliage from being battered over the sides.

That keeps the plants much stronger, but also it stops that stops a constant bombardment. It creates a shield and some shaded area for the buckets which will help retain water in really hot climates..

This may be something that you guys in Australia can use, because I know loads of you have had loads of problems with the heat this year.. So if you put like a wire mesh above then that will support that foliage up here, rather than it flopping over the sides, and that will act like a shade instead of you having to shade cloth everything.

. Now I'm gonna answer. Four other questions that I know I'm gonna get asked., So I'm gonna answer them here to make it easier. What size containers do I recommend? Well, I've tried all sizes of containers over the years, and if you look back through my videos, you will see me using a hundred and ten liter.

You'll, see me using 50 litres and 30 litres and even smaller.. I always revert back to these 30 litres containers because they give me the best results for the amount of effort and materials I have to use.

, So 30, liter or 10 gallons would be about perfect.. The second of those questions, is. Wow. It must be really expensive to fill all these containers. I have 80 of them that I filled this year. Now before I continue.

I've answered this loads of times, but buying compost for your garden is probably one of the best investments you can make. It has a total amount of organic matter and everything else. It improves the fertility of your soil and it also improves the structure of your soil.

. And if you do go down that road of buying compost, you can reuse it for the potatoes don't just stick it straight in the garden: grow your potatoes. In it first and even use it for a second year., But it's, not a waste of money, because then you can use it in the garden afterwards.

. However, all of the containers - or, I would say 95 % of the containers I'm growing in this year - have all my own homemade compost.. Now I made about 5 tonnes of compost last year and that's. What I'm, using in 95 % of my containers.

, Some containers, aren't using the compost for a reason for the video I explained earlier on with regards to what medium is best.. So some of the containers - don't have that compost in., But 95 % of it is all homemade and I'll, put a link in the show notes below on showing you exactly how i make that compost and how I make So much of it.

Question number 3 that they will get is what mulch are you using. Well for the floor? I'm using just standard woodchips and you can get these from any tree. Surgeon in your area so pick up the phone..

It may be a little hard at the moment with not so many people being in work, but they always have to get rid of this because it's, a waste material and usually they have to pay to dispose of it., but they're more than happy to drop it off to you usually free of charge.

. Now for the top of the containers, I'm using rape straw. It's, a byproduct of the oil seed, rape industry and it's. Fantastic because it's chopped up nice and small, and it holds loads of moisture. Now you can get this.

It's typically sold for horse bedding, so you'll, get it from most farm shops. And the fourth question that I'll, probably get is.. Can I use anything else as a mulch that I don & # 39? T need to buy The answer, for that is yes.

Again as described. You can use these wood chips, but at a push you could even use old, homemade compost or even shredded cardboard or paper things like this grass clipping.. All of these can be used as a mulch to help protect the surface of that soil.

. Follow these tips and you'll, never have to waste lots of money and time watering, your potatoes again.. If you & # 39, ve got value from this video. You can subscribe here. And when you've done that this is the next video should watch, because this will show you exactly everything you need to know about growing potatoes.

So that you get stunning harvests.. I'm Tony O'Neill and this is Simplify Gardening, where I show you well to garden in a simpler way.. Don't forget folks, You Reap What You Sow. I'll, see you in the next one.

bye-bye. I'm, a firm believer of growing potatoes in containers and one question that they always get asked is. How often, should I be watering my container potatoes well in this video? I'm gonna answer that question for you and I'm gonna give you a load of tips to help you retain water and make your lives much easier.

I'm Toni o Neill, and this is simplify. Gardening, we're to show you help the garden in a simpler way. If you want our perfect garden to relax in or just want to grow your own nutrient-dense foods then start now by clicking the subscribe button and the bell icon, then click all to be notified each time.

I release new content just like this, but before I get into the content, though, I would just like to say a massive thank you because a couple of days ago, my channel hit 100,000 subscribers and 8 million views.

I'm totally totally really appreciative of that and it's really humbling the fact that you guys continued support me every single day. So thanks very much for that. I appreciate it. So let's, get back onto the content.

If you asked a hundred gardeners, which is the best way to grow potatoes, you'd, get a hundred and one different answers for me, though, it has to be the container whether you're growing in pots bags or any other container.

It you get to choose the actual environment that your potatoes are growing in, and you're, not governed by the quality of your soil, because you can control this environment completely. Now. One thing that I've noticed with a lot of new gardeners, is that they struggle when growing in containers.

Due to the sheer amount of watering that's required they, they say that they're, constantly watering every single day and they're losing all the time because they can't keep the soil hydrated potatoes Require about an inch and a half of water per week, and that includes rainfall and in containers, though I know the people are struggling because in a container the surface area can evaporate and the water can run up to the holes in the bottom.

So it can really make keeping these more like quite a difficult task. So I'm gonna give you a load of tips in which to not only conserve moisture in these containers, but also make your lives easier. But before I do that, I'm going to answer the question outright.

How often do you need to water potatoes in containers? Well, you need to water about once a week when you first start your container and then, as the height of summer comes, then you want to be watering around about every three or four days now.

I know for some of you that's, unbelievable because you've been watering these every day and they've still been dry, but I'm gonna give you those tips right now. You may have tried growing potatoes and containers for many years and found yourself watering every single day, huge amounts of water to keep them hydrated.

So here's, a few tips to help you with that and kept the work down for the gardener. So my tip number one is to consider your soil soules hold varying amounts of moisture and compost is really good for this, because it holds lot of water due to the amount of organic matter in it.

It soaks this up like a sponge. Now it's, really important to keep your compost also whatever you're using moist, because if you don't keep it moist, it will dry out and it will shed water rather than absorbing it.

And you think that you've, given it enough water when in fact it's actually just running off tip number two is to bury the container about a fifth of its height. Now, as you can see, I've done that right here now.

What this does is it allows the water that is released will be holes in the container to be absorbed by whatever you bury the containers in, and this is fantastic, because that water can be absorbed instead of being lost, and then it can be released back into The container via the wicking process, now, as you can see what I've done here, I haven't buried.

My buckets I've, actually laid down a membrane, and I have placed the bucket on the mem and then I've, buried around the buckets with woodchip of different particle sizes and that's quite important. As you can see, we have all different sizes of woodchip particles here and both this does any water that is shared from the buckets is held within that wood chip, and then it can be released back to the buckets later.

That will also keep the containers cooler. So if you're suffering with heat like I know, a lot of you are in Australia and other places. What this does it, as this gets wet from the water that's escaped from the containers it is absorbed into this, and these then act like a heat sink and it absorbs the heat away from the potatoes.

So it's. Another really good point in mulching around. If you're using soil, it doesn't work so well, but using a wood chip around and it absorbs that heat really well. So it's, a really good way in to remove some of the heat from the containers in really hot places.

Now tip number three is to mulch, and a lot of you are now growing in these containers are very similar because of my potato growing videos that you've seen and I've, never noticed anybody else using mulch, but it's really important to most the surface now this does a couple of things: not only does it retain water in the actual compost or the soil litter using, but it also holds moisture because this much is absorbent and again that will hold most they're, keeping a moisture cap on top of the soil and will release that into the soil as is required.

Mulching the surface cannot only help to keep down evaporation, but the mouth itself really absorbent. So it holds the moisture and it releases this back to the soil as it grows out now I thought I'd, give you a practical view on this, because I watered these potatoes five days ago and, as you can see, the mulch on the Surface is really dry, but as you get down through the layers, it becomes moist and moister, and even the soil itself is still very moist.

So it's, perfect example of how the most wholes and retains water. These were watered five days ago and the soil itself is still damp, and this is perfect for potato growth because it has the moisture and the heat that's required for really good potato growth.

Now the mouse holds that moisture and releases it as its required and the Sun can't bake the top of the sole surface. Now this is good for a couple of reasons, but the main one is because it aids in future watering, because that soil, doesn't then just shared the water.

These three tips will really cut down on the amount of water. You're using and will save you hours worth of time in watering throughout the season, and this is how I'm growing mine this year, because it will save me loads and loads of time, and it will also allow the potatoes To fend for themselves should I not be able to come to the garden due to the current circumstances, so the next thing is: we need to look at the different forms of watering that we could use with these and their benefits and the reason why we should Use each of those the first way is to water by hand using a watering can now.

I know that this is a way in that most people are going to water, their potatoes and we simply water until the water runs over the holes in the bottom. But is this really a sufficient amount of water? I think not, and the reason for this is because, if you have a load that sort of to dry out, then that water will be shared by the compost and literally run down the sides of the containers and out of the holes.

And you think you've given enough water, but where, in reality it hasn't absorbed enough at all. However, the running water out to the bottom of the container is a great way to tell if there is plenty of water, but you need to do in a couple of ways.

If you find that you have dry soyal, then you need to water. First, give it about ten minutes and then give a second watering until it runs out the bottom of the container. At that point, you know you've absorbed enough water into the soil, to get it totally saturated and the soil moist enough right throughout its whole entirety, give it a second water, and if the soil is moist, you don't need To do that, you can just stick your finger in up to its neck.

Oh and you'll know. If it's moist or not. The next options we have would be to use some form of drip. Irrigation such as these, or even tea tape or soaker, hose a perforated hose that runs across the top, and when that is pressurized, it will slowly drip water onto the sole surface over a period of time.

Now that's, really good. If you & # 39, ve got time to allow it to water, or you can set up a pre watering time shared world very electronic timer or something because you can just connect it to a tap leave it on and it will kick on and off.

As and when which will keep these moist, however, you decide to water. Remember this one tip you're, far better off watering deeply and making sure that all the soil is moist. Then watering every single day get our soil really moist right from the start, and it also helps with the next watering from being absorbed.

Knowing when to water, is also really important, simply pull back the mouse. Stick your finger into that compost and if it comes out that you've got compost on your finger. You know its moist enough if it feels dry or anything like that.

It's time to water and water. It well like. We've, already discussed now, although I haven't done it. Yet. I'm implementing some other techniques across sure that will help me grow my potatoes. This year, I'm, going to raise some wire mesh screen with holes around about four inch square, like cattle grids, cattle wire and that's, going to be raised, maybe about a foot and a half above these containers.

What that is going to do is allow the potato homes to growth that way a mesh. It will support all of these container homes as one unit. So when it's windy and it heavy rain, the tops of the potatoes will stand up straight.

This will allow me to get in here and water if I require it, but more importantly, it keeps the foliage up hey. This will stop and act like a canopy stop in the Sun beating down on the surface. But, more importantly, it stops the foliage from being battered over the sides that keeps the plants much stronger, but also it stops that stops a constant bombardment.

It creates a shield and some shaded area for the buckets which will help retain water in really hot climates. This may be something that you guys in Australia can use, because I know loads of you have had loads of problems with the heat this year.

So if you put like a way a mesh above, then they'll support that foliage are pure round leaf flopping over the sides, and that will act like a shade, instead of you having to shade cloth everything. Now I'm gonna answer for the questions that I know I'm gonna get asked, so I'm gonna answer them here to make it easier what size containers do I recommend? Well, I've tried all sizes of containers over the years, and if you look back through my videos, you will see me using a hundred and ten liter.

You'll, see me using 50 litres and 30 litres and even smaller. I always revert back to these 30 liter containers because they give me the best results for the amount of effort and materials I have to use so 30 liter or 10 gallons.

It would be about perfect. The second of those questions is wow. It must be really expensive to fill all these containers and I have 80 of them that they fill this year now before I continue, I've answered this loads of times, but buying compost for your garden is probably one of the best investments you Can make it has a total amount of organic matter and everything else.

It improves the fertility of your soil and it also improves the stress, Chea song. And if you do go down that road of buying compost, you can reuse it for the potatoes don't just stick it straight in the garden: grow your potatoes in it first and even use it for a second year, but it'S not a waste of money, because then you can use it in the garden afterwards.

However, all of the containers - or, I would say 95 % of the containers I'm growing in this year - have all my own homemade compost. Now I made about 5 of 10 of compost last year and that's. What I'm, using in 95 % of my containers, some containers aren't using the compost for a reason for the video I explained earlier on with regards to what medium is best.

So some of the containers - don't have those composting, but 95 % of it is all homemade and I'll, put a link in the show notes below on showing you exactly how i make that compost and how i make so Much of it question number 3 that they will get is what mulch are you using well for the floor? I'm using just standard woodchips and you can get these from any tree.

Surgeon in your area so pick up the phone. It may be a little hard at the moment with not so many people being in work, but they always have to get rid of this because it's, a waste material and usually they have to pay to dispose of it bare they're more than happy to drop it off to you usually free of charge.

Now for the top of the containers, I'm using rape straw. It's, a byproduct of the oil seed, rape industry and it's. Fantastic because it's chopped up nice and small, and it holds loads of moisture. Now you can get this.

It's typically sold for horse bedding, so you'll, get it from most farm shops and the fourth question that they'll, probably get is. Can I use anything else as a most that I don & # 39? T need the bay and the answer for that is yes again as described.

You can use these wood chips, but at a push you could even use old, homemade, compost or even shredded cardboard or paper. Things like this grass clipping. All of these can be used as a MOS to help protect the surface of that soil.

Follow these tips and you'll, never have to waste lots of money and time watering, your potatoes again, if you've got value from this video you can subscribe here and when you've done that this is the Next video should watch because this will show you exactly everything you need to know about growing potatoes so that you get stunning harvests.

I'm Toni, o Neill, and this is simplify guarding, where I show you well to garden in a simpler way. Don't forget folks, you reap what you sow. I'll, see you in the next one, bye-bye

OUR SOCIALS: