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Hi everybody we're here back at beautiful Cloverfield farm. The weather is gorgeous today after a few days of intense heat that we almost died here, but we didn't. We're here back and Susan is gon. Na talk today about plums and pluots, and she's, going share with us the wealth of her knowledge about these fruit trees.

How you choose the right variety for where you live on, what you can do with the fruit? Well, hello! I'm Susan Truscott here at Cloverfield farm. We welcome you as it comes into summer to the season there of pluots and plums.

Pluots and plums are closely related. The plums are wild here in California and grow throughout California, as well as in Europe, and some of them have been crossed with apricots about 25 % of their parentage is apricots, and so they are very much like plums, but they're called pluots And we'll, see some of those growing here in the garden, the plums and pluots ripen over a fairly long period.

They start ripening about the middle of June and we should have plums and pluots available to you-pick from the farm until about early August. This is a fun pluot that's very productive. Here it's called splash pluot.

They're still green, but in about two or three weeks we'll have an abundance of these to harvest. They're, very sweet. That's. One of the features of the pluots is they tend to have slightly less acid and more sweetness.

This is one that's going to produce later and they're just tiny still, but this is a late SantaRosa, plum, Rosa, plum, growing. On this tree here, oh, this is the dapple dandy. This is one that ripens all around mid July and again, the fruits are small, but they're here on the tree.

Now this one is a flavor king. This is one of the later ones. In fact, you see the fruits are quite small on this one. This one doesn't ripen until the end of July, and they're deep purple when they do ripen another fun one is flavor grenade.

It's, also a pluot. It tends to have grenade shaped fruits and some of the legions been off, but they have kind of elongated. The different texture of this one is fun. It's, got a crunchy taste like an apple, so it's a little different than the other one.

It's, often really sweet. This one gets kind of crunchy and it also ripens a little bit later over here way up on the hillside, where we can see our native wild plums. So we'll just head over this way.

They're fun. It's, so heavily laden with fruit that they're, actually coming down here and almost knocking down the fence. And you know these are ripe when you see some of them starting to fall onto the ground, which tells you that they are tree-ripened and then to pick them.

You just run your fingers over them and the ones that are ripe just will fall gently into your hand. So these are quite good for baking. They're. They're a little bit tart, but the first one is that right.

Then here at the farm, mmm very juicy and delicious - I, like them, plums and pluots - are well adapted to growing in California and also in many regions of the country, but in California, especially, we're, blessed with very nice weather.

So we get really good, wet winters and hot sunny dry summers which the plums and pluots really enjoy. They seem to need nice, warm dry weather to ripen their fruit. The way to select a pluot for where you live is to first of all, to look at your soil.

You need good drainage, so you shouldn't, grow your plums and pluots in a low spot in the garden where the water puddles. So you might know this year from the heavy rains that we had, which areas in your garden might [ not be the wrong .

.. ] might be the wrong spot, so any place where you had puddling or a collection of water. That didn't drain off, say in a couple days, so here we grow them on a hillside which assures that we have really good drainage and we also have an area that's fairly bright.

So this area gets afternoon sun, but full sun in the morning, and we face east and there's, no trees overhead. So they get a lot of good sun through most of the day. The other thing that they need, in addition to good drainage, is enough chilling.

So you need to know your USDA growing zone and how many hours approximately of chilling you get so chilling hours are degrees and days where the temperature is between like 32 and 45 degrees. At night you need to have a certain number of those hours here in the Bay Area in El Sobrante.

We can reliably get about 500 or 600 hours. It would be rare, you might occasionally get it a year where you get more of it. That's about where you need to be so, when you're shopping for your trees, you want to go for more trees, at least for this area.

The bay area low chill so less than 500 hours or less, and then you'll, get good flowering and reliable fruit set. The varieties that are good for here are ones that are 500 hours or less so many of your Japanese plums.

So I'll name a few like burgundy, Shiro, Satsuma, and also your pluot varieties. The ones that have done really well for us are the ones that I & # 39. Ve shown you, the flavor King flavor, grenade splash does really well also elephant heart plum is an excellent choice, so all of those are good for this area, so in the valleys or if you live in the foothills in California, you probably get a lot more chilling Than that you probably remember several frosts and maybe even a little snow in some areas and in those areas you're, definitely going to be able to get more chilling, so maybe 800 hours or more.

You might even be so lucky as to be able to grow the European varieties, like dancing plums, are some of your PI plums. The best way to get started with planting a plum or pluot is to choose the variety you want to plant.

Now's, a really good time to do your shopping and look online to read about all the different varieties, because there's, so many of them. But then you buy your trees bare root. They'll ship them to you towards the end of December early January, and you have the best selection in the best price when they come, they come just as a stick.

Doesn't, look like much of anything at all, all, but just a very short stick about maybe waist high and with some roots on it. It you plant that in the ground - and you want to have it cut back because you want to encourage low branching, then you let it grow for about 2 or 3 years, and after about 3 years, you'll.

Get your your first good crop of fruit. If you're lucky, you might get one or two in the first year or two, but you have to put in about three years and be willing to wait that long for your first fruits.

If, for some reason you decide - and you want to be creative and start your own plum or pluot from fruit pit, which you can from the seed it can take up to ten years, so you might ..., I mean people who are developing fruit varieties for them.

They'll, wait that long, but if you want to get started and have fruits that you can enjoy in just a few years, buy a good bare-root tree and if you want to stay small, you can get it on dwarfing rootstocks, so that the Tree won't, be too big and overwhelm your garden.

One of the things that is also very nice about the plums and pluots is that they're. Naturally, disease resistant and don't have too many insect pests, at least here in the Bay Area. So will occasionally see like on this tree here.

A few little bites that some insect is bitten, but it's, never so much that it damages the tree or interferes with the crop. The other thing that helps with keeping your trees, healthy and protected from disease and insects is again plant them in a place that has very good drainage and good sunshine, because that helps the trees stay strong and also growing them.

In a diverse environment like here, where interspersed with a number of other plants, so you don't just have one variety of plant which would tend to attract diseases and pests. We grow ours on a terraced hillsides and the hillside is also covered with natural wild plants or cover crop which help bring in pollinators and predatory insects so that our trees stay very healthy and disease and insect free.

When we sighted our orchard, it was a fairly steep hillside covered with blackberries poison oak and a few wild plums. The wild plums were a good sign that this was a good spot to site our orchard. So what we had to do was clear off that cover crop.

We use goats and a little bit of a bulldozer like device that came in to kind of clear that the slope, but it wastoo steep to just plant directly on to so. We had some dead trees that we chopped up the the wood and you can see if you look through here.

We had these big rounds of all dead, pines and eucalyptus, and we created four different rows of those to terrace the hillside here and then, as we bring in more brush and build up the soil, the soil builds up behind those, and now we have a more Terraced garden, so it has excellent drainage, but it's that protects it from the soil eroding down the hill and also makes it able so that we can work with terraces.

Here at Cloverfield farm we try to have fruits for you all year. Around got a taste today of what we have in the garden. We welcome every one of you to come out on the weekends and the afternoons to pick fresh and buy from our garden, and if you love videos like this and want to see more, please subscribe to this YouTube channel.

Thank you. Hi everybody. We're here back at beautiful Cloverfield farm. The weather is gorgeous today after a few days of intense heat that we almost died here, but we didn't. We're here back and Susan is gonna talk today about plums and fluids, and she's, going share with us the wealth of her knowledge about these fruit trees.

How you choose the right variety for where you live on, what you can do with a seat? Well, hello! I'm Susan Truscott here at cloverfield farm. We welcome you as it comes into summer to the season. There were lots and plums, pluots and plums are closely related.

The plums are wild here in California and grow throughout California, as well as in Europe, and some of them have been crossed with apricots about 25 % of their parentage is apricots, and so they are very much like plums, but they're called pluots And we'll, see some of those growing here in the garden, the plums and pluots ripen opener over a fairly long period.

They start ripening about the middle of June and we should have bums and pluots available to you pick from the farm until about early August. This is a fun Flula that's very productive. Here it's called splash pluot.

They're still grieving that in about two or three weeks we'll have an abundance of these to harvest. They're, very sweet. That's. One of the features of the fluids is, they tend to have slightly less acid and more sweetness.

This is one that's going to produce later, and they're, just tiny still that this is a late, Santa Rosa, plum growing. On this tree here, oh, this is the dappled dandy. This is one that ripens all around mid July and again that the boots are small, but they're here on the tree.

Now this one is a flavor king. This is one of the later ones. In fact, you see the fruits are quite small on this one. This one doesn't ripen until the end of July, and they're deep purple when they do write to me another fun.

One is flavor grenade, it's, also a pluot. It tends to have grenade shaped roots and some of the legions been off, but they have kind of elongated. The different texture of this one is fun. It's, got a crunchy taste like an apple, so it's a little different than the other one.

It's, often really sweet. This one gets kind of crunchy and it also ripens a little bit later over here way up on the hillside, where we can see our native wild plums. So we'll just head over this way.

They're fun. It's, so heavily lazy with fruit that they're, actually coming down here and almost knocking down the fence. And you know these are ripe when you see some of them starting to fall onto the ground, which tells you that their tree ripened and then to pick them.

You just run your fingers over them and the ones that are ripe just will fall gently into your hand. So these are quite good for baking. They're. They're a little bit tart, but the first one is that right.

Then, here at the farm, mmm very juicy and delicious - I like them and pluots are well adapted to growing in California and also in many regions of the country, but in California, especially, we're, blessed with very nice weather.

So we get really good, wet winters and hot sunny dry summers which the plums and pluots really enjoy. They seem to Mead nice, warm dry weather to ripen their fruit. The way to select a plot for where you live is to first of all, look at their soil.

You need good drainage, so you shouldn't, grow your plums and pluots in a low spot in the garden where the water puddles. So you might know this year from the heavy rains that we had, which areas in your garden might not be the wrong that might be the wrong spot, so any place where you had puddling or a collection of water.

That didn't drain off, say in a couple days, so here we grow them on a hillside which assures that we have really good drainage and we also have an area that's fairly bright. So this area gets afternoon Sun, but full Sun in the morning, and we face east and there's, no trees overhead.

So they get a lot of good Sun through most of the day. The other thing that they need, in addition to good drainage, is enough chilling. So you need to know your USDA growing zone and how many hours approximately of chilling you get so chilling hours are degrees and days where the temperature is between like 32 and 45 degrees.

At night you need to have a certain number of those hours here in the Bay Area in El Sobrante. We can reliably get about 500 or 600 hours. It would be rare, you might occasionally get it a year where you get more of it.

That's about where you need to be. Is it so? When you're shopping for your trees, you want to go for more trees, at least for this area. The bay area load shell, so less than 500 hours or less, and then you'll, get good flowering and reliable fruit set.

The varieties that are good for here are ones that are 500 hours or less so many of your Japanese plums. So I'll name a few like burgundy, Shiro, Satsuma, and also your pluot varieties. The ones that have done really well for us are the ones that I & # 39.

Ve shown you, the flavor King flavor, grenade splash does really well also elephant heart plum is an excellent choice, so all of those are good for this area, so in the valleys or if you live in the foothills in California, you probably get a lot more chilling Than that you probably remember several Frost's and maybe even a little snow in some areas and in those areas you're, definitely going to be able to get more chilling, so maybe 800 hours or more, you might even be so Lucky as to be able to grow the European varieties, like dancing plums, are some of your PI plums.

The best way to get started with planting at plummer pluot is to choose the variety you want to plant now's, a really good time to do your shopping and look online to read about all the different varieties because there's.

So many of them, but then you buy your trees bare root. They'll ship them to you towards the end of December early January, and you have the best selection in the best price when they come, they come just as a stick.

Doesn't, look like much of anything at all, but just a very short stick about maybe waist high and with some roots on it. You plant that in the ground - and you want to have it cut back because you want to encourage low branching.

Then you let it grow for about 2 or 3 years, and after about 3 years, you & # 39. Ll, get your your first good crop of fruit. If you're lucky, you might get one or two in the first year or two, but you have to put in about three years and be willing to wait that long for your first fruits.

If, for some reason you decide - and you want to be creative and start your own plum or clue on from fruit pit, which you can from the seed it can take up to ten years, so you might, I mean people who are developing fruit varieties for them.

They'll, wait that long. But if you want to get started and have fruits that you can enjoy in just a few years by a good bare-root tree, and if you want to stay small, you can get it on dwarfing rootstocks, so that the tree will be one of the things.

That's, also very nice about the plums and pluots is that they're. Naturally, disease resistant and don't have too many insect pests, at least here in the Bay Area, so will occasionally see like on this tree.

Here, a few little bites that some insect is bitten, but it's, never so much that it damages the tree or interferes with the crop. The other thing that helps with keeping your trees, healthy and protective purposes, disease and insects is again plant them in a place that has very good drainage and good sunshine, because that helps the trees stay strong and also growing them.

In a diverse environment like here, where interspersed with a number of other plants, so you don't just have one variety of plant which would tend to attract diseases and pests. We grow ours on a terraced hillsides and the hillside is also covered with natural wild plants or cover crop which help bring in pollinators and predatory insects so that our trees stay very healthy and disease and insect free.

When we sighted our orchard, it was a fairly steep hillside covered with blackberries poison oak and a few wild plums. The wild plums were a good sign that this was a good spot to site our orchard. So what we had to do was clear off that cover crop.

We use goats and a little bit of a bulldozer like device that came in to kind of clear that the slope, but it was too steep to just plant directly on to so. We had some dead trees that we chopped up the the wood and you can see if you look through here.

We had these big rounds of all dead, pines and eucalyptus, and we created four different rows of those two terrace the hillside here and then, as we bring in more brush and build up the soil, the soil builds up behind those, and now we have a more Terraced garden, so it has excellent drainage, but it's that protect it from the soil eroding down the hill and also makes the table so that we can work with terraces.

Here at Cloverfield farm. We try to have fruits for you year round, got a taste today of what we have in the garden. We welcome every one of you to come out on the weekends and the afternoons to pick fresh and buy from our garden, and if you love videos like this and want to see more, please subscribe to this YouTube channel.

Thank you. You [ Music, ],

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