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Hi there it's Alexandra here from the Middlesized Garden, YouTube channel and blog, and i'm here at the Bath Priory hotel with head gardener, Jane Moore, to find out what you need to be doing in your garden.

Now that it's, the end of the summer. It's just about the beginning of autumn. The trees are beginning to turn the last flowers are just dying away, but Jane's garden because it's. In a hotel, the Bath Priory hotel, it has to look good 365 days a year and also as the author of Planting for Butterflies, she's very keen to balance how good the garden looks with making sure that it's.

Wildlife, friendly and sustainable, so I'm, going to ask her for her top tips for jobs that you need to do in your garden. If you'd, like to keep your garden looking good throughout the winter and preparing to make it look fabulous for next year and also balance it out, so that it is wildlife friendly.

So Jane, now we've got to the end Of the summer, beginning of autumn and the trees are beginning to go, what's, the most important thing we need to do in our garden. I think the first thing I would prioritize is actually doing nothing.

. I think leaving things to just settle themselves down and being very easy on. The secateurs is important.. It's, so tempting to just start cutting things back willy-nilly, and I actually think that things often look so good as we go into the autumn as they're fading.

. I quite like plants that die well, and so I try and pick plants that do actually go over really nicely. An example is something like verbena bonariensis, one of my favorite plants, both for wildlife and for late season color, because, actually, as it goes over as it finishes, it quite often goes really.

Nice dark, brown.. The flower heads often last really well as well. My other favorite plants for a & # 39. Beautiful death & # 39. Are things like hydrangeas.? Hydrangeas are real unsung heroes. I think they are brilliant shrubs.

They're, so easy going and I love an easy-going plant. I don't like plants. You have to fuss over too much, but I almost prefer them going over.. I love them when they're in flower, but as they go over as the flowers finish.

They often turn from quite a dull sort of whitey green into some really quite nice sort of almost rusty, pink shades, and I think they're almost better as they're finishing than they are when they're beginning.

. Well, it's rather nice to hear that actually doing. Nothing is the best thing to do at this time of year, but once we've done a bit of nothing. I think we might have to do something. So what would you say is the next most important job, My next job after nothing would be a little bit of gentle cutting back and while doing that, I tend to go around and think.

Is there anything that I actually want to take cuttings of & # 39? It's, not the ideal time of the year for taking cuttings, but it's not impossible to get things to root. So you can take cuttings from some of the tender salvias and some of the pelagoniums as you're, taking them in or sorting them out for autumn and winter.

It's really easy to take some cuttings now.. Another thing that I really like to do as I'm going around and just gently thinking about maybe tidying up a bit is to collect seeds and I collect an awful lot of seeds.

There's, something about collecting your own seeds. They've grown in your garden; they've grown well, and you've selected them that so you're, basically always honing. That variety to be the best variety that you want for your garden and I enjoy that whole process of actually just going and collecting the seeds and making sure that I've got them saved for next year.

. There's, some varieties that I've got in this garden, which came from one packet of seeds. I've, bought in 2007 from Thompson and Morgan and and Thompson & amp. Morgan has done very badly out of me. Ever since, because I've just collected the seed from it year after year after year.

. So are there any seeds in particular that you would recommend or not recommend, because I understand that F1 hybrids, ( and those are seeds which have F1 on the label of the seed packet? ) are specifically bred by seed companies, and I understand that those don't come out, particularly well if you collect seed from them.

Subsequently.. Oh, that's, an interesting question. My favorite seeds to collect the ones that are always so reliably good are amaranthus and calendula.. I love collecting my own calendula and again I'll, look for the ones that I think are a particularly nice color.

I really like the good rich burnt oranges, so I & # 39. Ll tend to go for those., Yes, F1 hybrids. There's, just no point in collecting their seeds.. Some of the veg seeds I've, had really bad luck with I've grown a few really nice French bean varieties and tried to collect and save the seed.

I did it all by the book and just had really poor germination rates from them, but things like runner beans. However, I've collected the seed year after year and if anything, the seeds got bigger and bigger and they germinate beautifully.

So those I've had really good success with, but to be honest, it doesn't, take much time to collect a few seeds and obviously don't go for the ones that you think are going to be really Tricky and that you've had poor germination from in the first place, but if you & # 39, ve grown things and they've done really well in your garden.

The chances are. If you collect the seed, they might do really. Well again, and if they don't, if it doesn't work out, then hey gardening's. All about trying and failing isn't it. So as we get nearer winter, what other jobs would you think we should be doing in our gardens? Well, eventually, you have got to actually start cutting things back and tidying up, and I do tend to do that quite quite toughly.

One of the other things that I tend to do is is de-leafing hellebores.. I often leave de-leafing my hellebores until we get near to mid-winter. You know it's. Quite a nice job to just tinker away at taking all the old leaves off.

As the new foliage and flower heads are coming, through. The Bath Priory hotel, has got three acres of garden and they're, divided up into smaller gardens each one of which you could call a middle-sized garden.

There's, a formal garden by the hotel, which is overlooked by the terrace, and that has herbaceous borders and a croquet lawn and lots of lovely little places you can sit and then the second garden is wilder it's, got a Lovely great big Cedar of Lebanon tree, which is really old.

, And it has a fallen mulberry tree, which is also really old, and it has swathes of meadow grass as well as formal lawn and beyond that there's. A vegetable garden. Jane is the author of Planting for Butterflies, and so as well as keeping this a formal garden which hotel guests can enjoy at all times.

She's, also very wildlife friendly, and they have a really nice way of treating old or fallen tree trunks, and they've become like sculptures in the garden.. I just love the way that this is a mulberry tree.

For example, it's fallen over, but actually it's still going on it's, still pumping out leaves - and it just looks so pretty - and a couple of other fallen leaves and tree trunks around the garden. Also, look like modern sculpture and there's, also some pieces of modern sculpture around the garden as well quietly concealed you just come across it and then think & # 39.

Oh, what's? That, In fact, is that an unexploded bomb & # 39. This is an old ash tree which fell down, and luckily didn't damage anything when it went and they & # 39. Ve created a really pretty seating area just beyond where it is, but they've left the tree here fallen.

Trees are really good for wildlife. They're, particularly good for insects., As we're tidying up our gardens. What would we be doing if we want to make sure that we do bear wildlife in mind? I always leave the ornamental grasses.

I never cut them back until the spring and that's, partly because they often look quite nice over the winter anyway, but also it does give a lot of little creatures a little bit of nesting material for if they & # 39.

Re sort of hibernating a bit over winter. A lot of the small mice and other creatures will often make little nests with things like Stipa tenuissima or the pheasant grass, and I have actually come across a hedgehog that was actually just nesting hibernating under a pile of Grass and as part of my tidying up.

, I was tidying up and there was this pile of sort of grass. I think it was Stipa tenuissima and it was just in a bit of a lump, and I thought I & # 39. Ve got to take that up and I lifted it and there was a lovely hedgehog all curled up underneath it.

So I put it back and replaced the grass on top of him. And, of course, what about bulbs., We plant bulbs every autumn and we always do pots of tulips for the spring. Our first National Garden Scheme event is usually in the spring, and so I like to have a really good display of tulips and things, but we'll, also naturalize, quite a lot of bulbs and over the years we've naturalized a Lot of daffodils, including the wild daffodil narcissus pseudo narcissus and created sort of little spring glades.

, And I really like things like anemone blanda and it's, so easy to naturalize and really doesn't cost very much to buy, and yet It'll. Just give you such a good show in the spring.. When I'm naturalizing bulbs, I always tend to think that they look brilliant under trees.

There's, something about trees coming to life in the spring. With those sort of lovely fresh greens, and if you & # 39, ve got a little carpet of bulbs. Underneath then, the whole thing just creates a beautiful scenario, and so the first little glade area we created was actually under an Amelanchier, which is one of the quintessential spring flowering trees.

And it was partly because the Amelanchier looked so beautiful sort of on the top level. It needed something at the lower level to just really highlight it, and that's, where we put narcissus psuedonarcissus, the wild daffodil and anemone blanda, and we've, also managed to naturalize some snakes head fritillaries as well, which I absolutely adore.

Probably my favorite native plant -it's, so beautiful. I've, got a playlist of tips from garden experts, which you can see at the end of this video and if you'd, like more tips, ideas and inspiration for Your garden then do subscribe to the Middlesized Garden YouTube channel and thank you for watching goodbye hi there.

It's alexandra here from the middlesized garden, youtube channel and blog, and i'm here at the bath priory hotel with head gardener. Jane moore, to find out what you need to be doing in your garden now that it's the end of the summer, it's just about the beginning of autumn.

The trees are beginning to turn. The last flowers are just dying away, but jane's garden because it's in a hotel, the bath priory hotel. It has to look good 365 days a year and also as the author of planting for butterflies, she's very keen to balance how good the garden looks with making sure that it's, wildlife, friendly and sustainable.

So i'm, going to ask her for her top tips that you need to do in your garden. If you'd, like to keep your garden looking good throughout the winter preparing to make it look fabulous for next year and also balance it out, so that it is wildlife friendly, so jane, now we've got to the end of The summer, beginning of autumn trees, beginning to go what's, the most important thing we need to do in our garden.

I think the first thing i would prioritize is actually doing nothing. I think leaving things to just settle themselves down and being very easy on the secateurs. It's, so tempting to just start cutting things back willy-nilly, and i actually think that things often look so good as we go into the autumn as they're fading.

I quite like plants that die well, and so i try and pick plants that do actually go over really nicely um. A casing point for that is something like verbena bonariensis, one of my favorite plants, both for wildlife and for late season color, because actually, as it goes over as it finishes, it quite often goes really.

Nice dark brown, the flower heads and they often last really well as well. My other favorite plants for beautiful death are things like hydrangeas. Hydrangeas are real unsung heroes. I think they are brilliant shrubs.

They're, so easy going and i love an easy-going plant. I don't like plants. You have to fuss over too much, but i almost prefer. I love them when they're in flower, but as they go over as the flowers finish, they often turn say from just an it's, quite a dull sort of whitey green.

They'll, often turn into some really. Quite nice sort of almost rusty, pink shades and i think they're almost better as they're finishing than they are when they're beginning well, it's rather nice to hear that actually doing.

Nothing is the best thing to do at this time of year, but once we've done a bit of nothing. I think we might have to do something. So what would you say is the next most important job, my next job after nothing would be a little bit of gentle cutting back it'd.

Also, be i almost by way of doing that i tend to go around and think. Is there anything that i actually want to take cuttings of it's, not the ideal time of the year for taking cuttings, but it's? Not you know it's not impossible to get things to root.

So some of the tender salvias um uh, some some of the pelagoniums and things as you're sort of taking them in as you're, sorting them out for autumn and winter really easy to take some cuttings. Now. Another thing that i really like to do as i'm going around and just gently thinking about maybe tidying up a bit is to collect seeds and i collect an awful lot of seeds.

We there's, something about um collecting your own seeds. They've grown in your garden. They've grown well, you've selected them that so you're, basically always honing. That variety to be the best variety that you you want for your garden and i quite enjoy that whole sort of process of actually just going and collecting the seeds and making sure that i've got them saved for next year.

There's, um some varieties that i've, got in this garden that i've bought one packet of seeds in 2007, from thompson and morgan and and thompson morgan has done very badly out of me ever since, because I've, just collected the seed from it year after year after year.

So are there any seeds in particular that you would recommend or not recommend, because i understand that f1 hybrids and those are things you will see them on the label in the seed packet they'll, say f1, hybrid and because those are specifically bred By seed companies, i understand those don't come out, particularly well in seed.

Oh, that's. An interesting question. My favorite seeds to collect that are always so reliably good are amaranthus calendula. I love collecting my own calendula and again. I'll, look for the ones that i think are a particularly nice color.

I really like the good rich burnt oranges, so i & # 39. Ll tend to go for those f1 hybrids. There's, just no point in collecting seeds. Um some of the veg seeds i've, had really bad luck with i've grown a few really nice french bean varieties and tried to collect and save the seed done it all by the book and just had really poor germination Rates from them things like runner, beans um, however, i've collected the seed year after year and if anything, the seeds got bigger and bigger and they germinate beautifully.

So so those i've had really good success with, but to be honest, it doesn't, take much time to collect a few seeds and i think we'll. You know. Obviously, don't go for the ones that you think are going to be really tricky and that you & # 39.

Ve had poor germination from in the first place, but if you & # 39, ve grown things and they & # 39. Ve done really well in your garden. The chances are if you collect the seed, they might do really well again and if they don't, if it doesn't work out, then hey gardening's.

All about trying and failing isn't it so as we get nearer winter, what other jobs would you think we should be doing in our gardens? Well, eventually, you have got to actually start cutting things back and tidying up, and i do tend to um do that quite quite toughly.

Actually um, one of the other things that i tend to do is is de-leafing hella balls. I often leave de-leafing my hellebores as that sort of as we get towards christmas. You know it's, quite a nice job to just tinker away at and take all the old leaves off as the new um as the the flower beds are coming through.

The bath priory hotel has got three acres of garden and they're, divided up into smaller gardens, each one of which you could call a middle-sized garden. There's, a formal garden by the hotel, which is overlooked by the terrace, and that has herbaceous borders and a croquet lawn and lots of lovely little places you can sit and then the second garden is wilder it's, got a Lovely great big cedar of lebanon tree, which is really old.

It has a fallen mulberry tree, which is also really old, and it has swathes of meadow grass as well as formal lawn and beyond that there's. A vegetable garden jane is the author of planting for butterflies, and so as well as keeping this a formal garden which hotel guests can enjoy at all times.

She's, also very wildlife friendly, and they have a really nice way of treating old or fallen tree trunks, and they'd, become like sculptures in the garden. I just love the way that this is a mulberry tree.

For example, it's fallen over, but actually it's still going on it's, still pumping out leaves - and it just looks so pretty - and a couple of other fallen leaves and tree trunks around the garden. That look like modern sculpture there's, also some little bits of modern sculpture around the garden as well quietly concealed you just come across it and then think.

Oh, what's? That, in fact, is that an unexploded bomb - this is an old ash tree which fell down, and luckily didn't damage anything when it went and they've created a really pretty seating area, just beyond where it is, but they've left the tree here.

Fallen. Trees are really good for wildlife. They're, particularly good for insects. As we're tidying up our gardens. What would we be doing if we want to make sure that we do bear wildlife in mind? I always leave the ornamental grasses.

I never cut them back until the spring and that's, partly because they often look quite nice over the winter anyway. But also it does give a lot of little creatures, a little bit of nesting material for if they're sort of hibernating a bit over winter.

A lot of the small sort of mice and things will often make little nests with things like steeper. Tenuisima or the pheasant grass and i have actually come across a hedgehog that was actually just nesting hibernating under a pile of grass and as part of my tidying up, i was i had this.

There was this pile of sort of grassy um. I think it was steeper tenuisma, you know perfect, and it was just in a bit of a lump and i thought i've got to take. You know tidy that up and i lifted it and there was a lovely hedgehog, all curled up underneath it.

So i plunked it back on top of him and, of course, what about bulbs, the bulbs i tend to plant, we plant bulbs every autumn and we always do um pots of tulips and things for the real sort of spring show.

You know our first national garden scheme event is usually in the spring, and so i like to have a really good display of tulips and things. But we'll, also naturalize, quite a lot of bulbs, and over the years we've.

Naturalized a lot of daffodils, including the sort of wild daffodil narcissus pseudo narcissus and created sort of little little spring glades and little sort of like bulb areas. I really like things like anemone blander and it's, so easy to naturalize and really doesn't cost very much to buy, and yet it'll.

Just give you such a good show in the spring, when i'm naturalizing bulbs, i always tend to think that they look brilliant under trees. There's, something about trees coming to life in the spring, with those sort of lovely, fresh greens, and if you & # 39, ve got a little carpet of bulbs underneath then the whole thing just creates a beautiful scenario, and so the first little Glade area we created was actually under an amalanchia, which is one of the quintessential spring flowering trees, and it was partly because the amelanchia looked so beautiful sort of on the top level.

It needed something at the lower level to just really highlight it, and that's, where we put narcissus narcissus, the wild daffodil and anemone blander, and we've, also managed to naturalize some snakes head fritillaries as well, which i absolutely adore.

Probably my favorite native plant, so beautiful, i've, got a playlist of tips from garden experts, which you can see at the end of this video and if you'd like more tips, ideas and inspiration for your garden then do subscribe To the middlesized garden youtube channel and thank you for watching goodbye.

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